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. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
. but parole. within eight years he could be eligible. this person did america a favor by helping out our droops out of iraq and afghanistan, reporting the wars weren't going anywhere as well as the president wanted to us do be. just just like daniel in vietnam and he needs our thanks. >> you recognize size the other side of that as well. >> you couldn't run a government if people were allowed to make these jump little, if we have good internal systems for whistle blowing and a system where you could get off, make it a defense that it was in the public interest. >> thank you for being with us, the senior managing attorney at the certainty for constitutional right here in new york. good to talk to you. flesh. >> you are thanks for having me. >> wild fires burning in the west are now threatening a national treasure. in northern california, a 25 square mile fire is out of control nereo sim at this national park. more than 50 fires are threatening people and property across at least 10 western states, the national i want agency fire center is now at its highest state of alert. that has not ha
mayoral candidate and the man who will be paying for the braces on the teeth of america's comedians, anthony weiner. first, something more important. your right to vote. after months on the political sidelines, mrs. clinton took up the fight yesterday, condemning the supreme court's recent position to gut the voter's rights act and the string of red states rushing to aid in its demise. yesterday, north carolina joined texas, mississippi and alabama in passing strict voter i.d. requirements, a move mrs. clinton says will usher in the old demons of discrimination. >> in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights have been introduced in 31 states. now, not every obstacle is related to race but everyone who says that racial crimination is no longer a problem in american elections must not be paying attention. >> john: the speech delivered before the american bar association, the first of a series of addresses mrs. clinton plans to give this fall, each one addressing a challenge she says is undermining america's faith in government. well, hey, why wait? i'm sure she's jus
to see how far our labor stand has fallen behind other countries. i want america to be number one, not number one in foreign countries occupied or number one in number of people incarcerated. i want america to be number one in wages. i want america to be number one in benefits. i want america to be number one in healthcare. in australia, they have a $16 an hour minimum wage. in germany, people routinely, as a matter of law get up to six weeks off each year and they get 44 days of paid sick leave. germany is not impoverished by that. they're strengthened. we need to make the same sort of steps here in america to improve the working conditions of the people who work. >> john: i think germany providing their version of medicare for everyone who makes under $100,000 has something to do with that of course. >> germany has had universal healthcare for a century. we're still arguing about it here in the united states. >> john: 100 years after teddy roosevelt ran for it on the progressive ticket. >> that's right. >> john: pushback is the only thing we're getting from our republican friend
and the administration is absolutely right when they say they want and america wants inclusive tolerant institutions in egypt. the question is, how do build them, and we -- the way to build them is not to burn them down. that's why i think we should retain our strong rlelationship with the military. not because we condone it or agree with it, it's the only power in town. if we going rebuild egypts institution, it's better to rebuild from within than burn them down and start from scratch. simply put, the big state is better than no state. that's the only choice facing us nous. >> countries at odds with each other. israel and the non-secular people, the black costuming people, who really want a religious state's in people in northern ireland who want to be forever a part of britain and others who very much want to be a republic of ireland. here are here want sharia led, real islamic law, political power and other people who are just egyptians who want to live the way egyptians have lived for thousands of years. can they be co-habitating? is in a model for them to cohabitate that country? >> that's a q
standards that are in little of informational texts. america is seeing two paths. choice or centralized education by the common core national standards. we have a choice to make. are we going to be a self- governing society or are a -- or society governed by despotism. a portion of one of the many education related events during c-span cost -- c-span's town hall program. we invite you to join the conversation. it starts tonight, 7:30 p.m. eastern time >> tonight on "first ladies." sofrances cleveland is popular. people are imitating her hairstyle. of her for piece themselves. we have always hurt as if we if we owned the first lady peered pictures of the first lady lady became extremely popular. you could purchase your own picture to have in your home. she is used in campaigns. we also have ms. cleveland running for first lady. >> the encore presentation of "first ladies" continues tonight at 9:00 eastern leading up to our live event at 11:00 this morning with the help secretary, we will hear about health care from vic morris, the former linton white house adviser. he speaks for about 25
jazeera america. good evening. newt gingrich today came out and said the republican party has to be less vicious and negative. newt gingrich called other republicans vicious and negative, and somewhere, an angel coughed up blood. also, rick perry is going to run for president again, the man who thought arab spring was a saudi death rant. i'll give a list of every democratic that demanded to see the birth certificate. >> 48 years ago tonight, the balesles in vented legendary rock at shea stadium. 44 years ago, the woodstock music festival opened and tonight, we present to you the final hour of original programming produced for current t.v. it has been my privilege to host this show. this evening, we say goodbye with roseanne barr, lewis black, heroic activate and new town survivor erika laughty. i am john fugelsang, this is and has been viewpoint. [ cheers and applause ] ♪ theme >> sit down. sit down! good evening, i'm john fugelsang, this is viewpoint. on this show, i get to say what i want to say, and how i want to say it. that is rare in t.v. i thank current and the guys at al jazeer
angry, america. >>> good morning, america. i know some people that are really happy. here are the winning numbers in the lottery. get it out. 5, 25, 30, 58, 59 and the powerball, 32. >> oh. foiled by 32. >> just -- i was just going to say, that 32. >> we were close. line up because we've all gone winless. except for three. two of them coming actually in new jersey. here's one look at little egg harbor. it is in the sandy disaster zone. so, some real joy headed to a place that could use it. meanwhile, our linsey davis tracking the latest overnight from another winning location in the state of new jersey. that's where we find her. south brunswick, the place. linsey davis, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, josh. this is the super stop 'n shop. things opening up here. we were able to talk to one of the employees not too long ago inside. and he was telling us this isn't normally the place that has lottery frenzy. if you wanted to line up for a powerball ticket, there was no line at all. and while he has no idea who purchased that winning ticket, he's convinced som
that attracted the president to want to go? >> it was a world there. -- fair, it was a celebration of america's place in the new world. the presidency was very surprising in many ways. in fact, he was the president who took the country to the world stage. the spanish-american war and turned america into a republican into an empire. at the end of his life in the last speech he gave, in effect he talks in ways that years later we can all appreciate about opening america to the world. >> we were looking at our posting and everybody is asking about what is known of ida mckinley, her ill health. here she is traveling with the president. what did the country think of the president to know about her? >> it is an interesting dichotomy. this is the pattern of her life. she had been grossly miscast by history as this victorian invalid on the fainting couch. there were times when she was that way. she had chronic illnesses. one was seizure disorder, known as epilepsy. she had damage along her left leg which led to immobility. she also had a compromised immune system. she was susceptible to infections. t
between race and the criminal justice system. lawyer part of the moving america towards justice series. march onlso a special washington event. to haverivileged today a dynamic group of individuals who will guide our coverage around the complicated tough relationship between race and the criminal justice system. a briefrovide introduction for each panelist. they will then be allowed a short amount of time to present their area of expertise and focus and then we will open the floor after i have a series of brief questions to the panel. we will open the floor for your questions. i hope that you have gotten the cards and written your questions down. you will be holding them up so our people can collect them and bring them to me to read. before we get to the panel, it is a pleasure for me to introduce the president of the national bar association, patricia rosier. -- i just can't have her come up. she is the president of the national bar association, the nation's largest association of african american lawyers in justice. portionedicated a major of her life's work to the bar association. s
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
republicans don't do enough is give an alternative. we need to start telling the people of america what our health care alternative is and we've yet to do that. >> bob, there's no accountability as we've been saying about other issues because of hyper partisan districts. if i'm a gop member of the house and rail against obama care and say let's defund the government, et cetera, et cetera, and maybe public surveys across the country say that individual is out of step, chances are they're not out of step in their own district. >> i think that's true. one of the problems the republican party has now is that it rode the tea party to power in the house in 2010 and now stuck with all those people. i think john is largely right about what sensible republicans want to do. i'm not sure he's right about the ways out. but you have a whole group of folks who might just take this over the cliff. if boehner holds to the rule that he has to have a majority of the majority before he'll bring anything to the floor, you might just have a government shutdown. and sensible people in the republican party like j
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
, america became more free and more fair. america changed for you and for me. [ bells tolling ] >> reporter: moments before the president spoke, bells rang out across the u.s. to commemorate the moment in 1963 when dr. king uttered his famous phrase. >> as the bells toll today, let us reflect on the bravery, let us reflect on the sacrifice of those who stood up for freedom. >> reporter: among the thousands in washington was edith lee payne who was there 50 years ago as well. the detroit woman who was as a child seen in this iconic 1963 photo reflected on both events. >> why was it important to be here? >> because my mother brought me. and if we're going to continue to make change and make this world better, we have to be a part of that change. >> reporter: the thousands that showed up battled rain, humidity and long security lines, but they stayed to honor the freedom marchers of 50 years ago. john and diana? >> tahman, thank you. >> tough to navigate. president obama opening his mouth and getting some people annoyed. other people saying great. he really had to please a lot of people with t
. america live starts right now. >> starting with the fox news alert. a big opening blast on what is described as the potential coming war over who gets to vote. welcome everybody to america live and so there are debates breaking out over how our elections should be held and what rules will be in place when it comes to voting. the issue erupted after the supreme court went down and that gave a bit more power to set their own rules on these things and that ruling sparked protest and drew sharp criticism from the justice department and former secretary of state addressed the issue at an event that many will be a 2016 presidential run for her. >> we have seen a sweeping effort in our country to obstruct new obstacles to voting. under cover and addressing election fraud. in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights are introduced in 31 states. not every obstacle is to race. but those who say racial is not a problem in the election must not be paying attention. >> that is from hillary clinton. >> our host of power play. chris. chris, is this the makings of a battle tha
that was badly needed in america not only for those in attendance but those who could hear and see on television and to send a message to washington, to the state houses, to the local levels that the movement is still alive. and we have to believe that, and we have to act on it. i'm one of the old citizens of the time. i could not help but reflect on things such as the fact that we were not allowed -- people of color were not allowed on television shows. we did hold places in government. i used the theme that had such a negative connotation, stand your ground. i hope i got over to the crowd we need to seize that and use it as our own in a positive way. stand our ground for what we believe, for what we have worked and for what we have died for and move forward. >> it's a reclamation of that spiritual "we shall not be moved" that version of stand your ground. i love what you said about the young people. there was a group from howard university right there near where our msnbc stand was all day. i could sort of watch and see how they were responding. but it was also important what you just said abo
offered a chilling prediction for america that she calls inevitable. we will cover her less than an uplifting words. next. with centurylink as your trusted partner, our visionary cloud infrastructure and global broadband network free you to focus on what matters. with custom communications solutions and responsive, dedicated support, we constantly evolve to meet your needs. every day of the week. centurylink® your link to what's next. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is one take away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraced as secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also the first woman to hold the
napolitano offered a chilling prediction for america th she calls inevitable. inevitable. we will cover her@áh%h%k%k%k5 aaah! aaaaah! theres a guy on the window! do something, dad! aaaah! aaaah! what is happening? they're rate suckers. their bad driving makes car insurance more expensive for the rest of us. good thing there's snapshot from progressive. snap it in and get a discount based on your goodriving. stop paying for rate suckers. try snapshot free at progressive.com. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is oneake away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraceds secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also th
history, talking about the pentagon papers, the water gate scandal, more recently their top secret america piece -- series, the walter reed medical hospital series that won him the pulitzer. there's the question of like is there going to be an investment -- and is there an investment in had this digital age in terms of that kind of reporting, that kind of granularity, that kind of fact finding and that commitment to stories that may not get a lot of click-throughs at the beginning or ever but matter in terms of information and awareness. >> well, i think the answer is both yes and i hope so, and it has to be. a couple things. a lot of this is due -- a lot of the kinds of journalism that you are talking about is due to the commitment of the families and the people who own these institutions. as john said, the grahams. i was lucky to have worked for the grahams because "newsweek" where i worked for many years is owned by "the washington post" company. i had a lot of of company with him. the grahams were an inspiration. before that i worked in louisville for the bingham family that owned "the
there are 40 million muslims in america? these images that's we see of burning vehicles, they will be everyday. host: ok, to a for the call. this is from marie -- obama got us into this debacle in egypt prompting me muslim brotherhood. there is this headline, the journalists among the dead in egypt, including the husband and a former "post" reporter who was killed. more details on mick deane, who was killed in cairo. a statement from the british prime minister david cameron who paid tribute to the reporter on twitter -- i am sad to hear the death of cameraman mick deane. my thoughts are with his family and a sky news team. my next call is rich from fairfax, virginia. republican, good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was disgusted last night was watching the news, and i saw a caterpillar bulldozer into their where thesehe area people were. that equipment i'm sure was bought with money the united states gave the egyptian army. i just think of how that equipment is used in this country, to build things, and we are over there destroying stuff. it just makes me sick. we need to stop
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
. those are twot key questions being asked in the wake of major developments on america's crime beat. >> reporter: attorney general eric holder unveiled sweeping new criminal justice reforms saying long prison terms for drug offenses are not making the u.s. safer. >> we need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, to deter, and rehabilitate, but not really to warehouse and to forget. >> reporter: meantime, the federal judge delivered a significant ruling. saying a hard line approach in new york city, a policy, stop and frisk has violated the constitutional rights of minorities. it was a blow for mayor michael bloomberg with far reaching implications. >> if this decision were to stand it would turn those precedents on their head and make our city and in fact the whole country a more dangerous place. >> reporter: the judge appointed a federal monitor saying police discrimination against blacks and latinos was widespread. with hundreds of thousands of innocent people stopped over the last decade. violent crime is down in new york and across the country. but if these tough laws g
creating competitive industry. >> but since 2000 there's only new carrier in our country virgin america. we have on the others one in minnesota but there new carrier viable since 2000. and don't you think there are to entry that make it hard for new airlines to competitive? over thenk if you look last many years there have been industry.ts into the jetblue is a great example of a -- that sprang grown last decade and has nationwide. so, i think there are ample opportunities and capital vailable for new airlines to enter the market. >> i note that jetblue is only we have nowrket and these three major carriers. do you want to respond? first off, again noting how complementary our two networks by putting them together we create a third competitor -- fourth competitor to what are three airlines larger ta and s, united, dell southwest and allows more competition, not less. 12 laps overlatch being out put00 -- overlapping we can more efficient service to consumers. also note that in the $1 billion synergies that i noted there s not one assumed fare increase. he synergies are not built on assum
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
in the region. this is something that is going to require america's attention, hopefully the entire international community's attention. >> senator john mccain came on "new day" very strong on this. he believes the u.s.'s credibility in the region has been hurt, that a situation like syria, that he believes, there's been delay, and it has led to a bolds by the regime there, that in egypt that what many believe is a coup wasn't called a coup. >> i am sympathetic to senator mccain's passion for helping people work through what is an extraordinarily difficult and heart-breaking situation, but what i think the american people also expect me to do as president is to think through what we do from the perspective what is in our long-term national interest. sometimes what we've seen is folks will call for immediate action, jumping into stuff that does not turn out well, gets us mired in very difficult situations, can result in us being drawn in to very expensive, difficult, costly interventions that actually breed more resentment in the region. we have to think through strategically what is
need to do we need to acquit allies, it cannot look like america jumping in to another civil war in the middle east trying to get involved. this should be the world community coming together, not everybody in the world, we need to make it clear we have no interest in getting in the middle of this civil war, no interest in choosing sides and getting out. lori: can you pinpoint but chemical weapons? can you take out those chemical weapons with a missile strike or do you have to have boots and the ground? do you know the particulars of that? >> some say you have to have. on the ground. everything i read from credible people that i trust say that you can do this from a standoff, you can have ships in the mediterranean, tomahawk cruise missiles equipped in a certain way but if these syrian chemical weapons depots, we know the israelis have done this, they have bombed and taken out syrian chemical weapons sites, i don't know why we couldn't be able to do that but if we go and think we are going to topple assad or kill assad what is the next government that goes after assad? al qaeda. t
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. lots in california. >> happiest cities in america. >> on the west coast. i know green bay, wisconsin, made that list. >> it did. we were all surprised about hi. my name is cj. a few years ago, my father became seriously ill. i did what i could do before he passed, but it took its toll. i lost my job, my house. i'm getting back on my feet, but i don't know when there'll be food on the table. how'd i do, cj? we could be twins. well, cousins maybe. announcer: play a role in ending hunger. visit feedingamerica.org/hunger and find your local food bank. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- terror fears. new details about a threat that has forced the u.s. to close embassies overseas all week and strengthen security here at home. >> plot to kill. the ugly accusations and allegations against an attractive college co-ed. police and prosecutors say a 21-year-old student was out for some lethal revenge against two ex-boyfriends. >> getting bullish, not in spain but in the u.s. coming to the cities coast to coast. why the events are so controversial and why some people cannot wait to run for t
stains. ♪ >>> america just can't compete in this connected world without a super fast information highway. that's why the government has set aside billions to upgrade the nation's internet service. >> but abc's david kerley found $1 million wasted in a single closet in west virginia on the washington watch dog beat. [ modem handshaking ] >> reporter: speed, we crave it on the internet. a fast connection. we need it to remain competitive in a global economy says the president. >> to harness the full power of the internet. that means faster and more widely available broadband. >> reporter: the to spread broadband the government came up with $7 billion and thousands of communities have been hooked up. but take a look at this -- these boxes stacked up in a west virginia closet are blazing fast, high speed routers, you paid for them $20,000 each. they're unused. the state bought too many and the wrong ones. $1.25 million in this closet gathering dust for nearly three years now. enough for a year's pay for 30 teachers. that's not all. congressional investigators questioned other spendin
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
parties and a funeral, plus plenty of valet parking in america's gilded capitol. read the book and engage on our facebook page and twitter. "washington journal" continues. host: at the table now, michael steele, the former r.n.c. chairman from 200-2011, thank you for joining us. we've been talking about syria, do you see a division within the republican party on syria? guest: i don't think there's been a clear voice that's come out about what republicans say about this. certainly there is a union anymority about what we need to do next, which is definitely deal with the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. but i think a lot of republicans are waiting to see exactly where the president is going to go with the foreign policy. you have the secretary of state calling this a moral obscenity. so the tone and the rhetoric is there. the question is now what are the next steps? the president and his team have been very good, at least in this instance, of getting and keeping the congress informed, getting members of congress in on the conversation early enough, so that should some type
>>> making news in america this morning -- growing pressure. the obama administration says a chemical weapons attack did kill hundreds of people in syria, as the u.s. moves closer to military action. we're live in washington with the latest. >>> gaining ground. firefighters finally making progress on a massive wildfire burning near yosemite national park. but the concern is far from over. >>> subway scare. an elderly man gets his foot stuck in a train door and goes on a terrifying ride. >>> and caught off guard. what question puzzled the beauty pageant contestant, prompting this response -- >> and believing when you see, it's perfect. >>> good tuesday morning, everyone. we begin with the growing crisis in syria and what is increasingly appearing to be an imminent u.s. strike against the assad regime. >> it comes after u.n. weapons inspectors visited the apparent site of a chemical attack last week. and now, this morning, the strongest words yet from a u.s. official. abc's devin dwyer has the latest from washington. good morning, devin. >> reporter: good morning. the strong
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
. plus, hundreds of feet beneath a mcdonald's a hidden chamber where america stored nukes. >> this is constantly alarmed and there is a guard course protecting this facility. >> for decades it was a secret. >> the rumors have been around forever. >> there was a feeling that there was something going on down here. now, fox news takes you inside the lois los alamos nuclear tunnel. first from fox this wednesday night, the baby shot to death in his stroller. today, in court heard from a teenager who stood and watched as an older teen shot 13 month old santiago in the face. police call the younger teen an accomplice. prosecutors have asked him to testify as the older teen stands trial. both suspects face murder charges. this is the teenager on trial now. police say he tried to rob the mother on a street in southeast georgia back in march. they say the mom claimed she didn't have any money and that's when the teen shot her in the leg and in the ear and shot the baby in the head. one bullet. between the eyes. but defense attorneys have suggested the mother had a financial interes
issues. >> this morning on "world news now" -- rich relief. the world meets america's newest millionaire. we have new details about who is taking home one of the jack pots from new jersey. also ahead. >> my main goal for this whole project is to find the real paul. >> the decade old mystery of a missing baby. why this man believed that little boy was him. in an abc news exclusive, barbara walters sits down with the man in the middle of the heartbreaking mix-up. >> then forget about laying on the beach. how about hovering high above it. the newest vacation sensation. it's friday, august 9th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller and diana perez. >>> tgif. can i get a high five. >> yes. >> we feel brown today. i feel like we work for ups or something. >> just need our patches. couple of things to deliver. >> boxes. >> couple boxes. it is friday. perfect way to start friday. starting with a feel good story. >> let's get to it. feel belt irtter if it was me. learning details about one of the winning powerball tick tets. >> but by a group of vehicle workers an
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